Some more end of the week, end of the month of August 2019 notes:

  • I am happy that have found this guy actively contributing useful open source software to fill the gap in the parent pdfmake library.
  • Design systems, style guides, cookbooks. Reading this post: https://viljamis.com/2018/vue-design-system/ and the resulting https://vueds.com/ and working bit by bit on my own design system as I have been slowing working on RSLH.
  • "Don't forget the meat": Ate lunch at the DQ next to my work. I ordered a cheeseburger and soon enough my food was brought to me. It feels a little light as I'm unwrapping it, so I look a little closer -- there is no hamburger patty. The woman working there apologized and was embarrassed about it. Apparently this was not the first time she's put together a meatless cheeseburger this week. Everyone on her shift had a good laugh about DQ selling meatless burgers for the same price as a regular one. Whether you're shipping burgers or shipping a new software release, it makes sense to have some kinda of quality checks on your core features (at the very least) before you hand things over to your clients.
  • Consistent Quality Builds Reputation: In a discussion about upcoming films with some friends, a common thread came up about quality that got me thinking about how to determine whether a future film would be worth worth watch. Some directors are very protective of their reputation and strive for a consistent minimum level of quality, but others do not. The same is true for screenwriters, cinematographers, and so on. You might not have know specifically that Deakins was the cinematographer, but if you look back at his filmography, nearly every film is worth seeing. You might not know Hoyte van Hoytema, but his reputation as built by his previous cinematography alone has sold me on seeing Ad Astra.
  • From 'Office Space' to Open Office Hell: While on a walk to grab a smoothie with a coworker, we talked about how the trend these days is for companies to have completely open offices and that it is anywhere close to a positive work environment. It was just a few decades ago when 'Office Space' came out where Peter got rid of his cubical walls, and now here we are wishing we had cubicals because open offices is terrible for deep concentration work. We both agreed that private offices would be best case scenario, in addition to many small conference rooms for small team collaboration as needed.